Book Review: The Thyroid Connection by Amy Myers, MD

Dr Amy Myer’s generously offered to send me a copy of her second book, The Thyroid Connection, a year ago now and although I finished reading it a good six months ago, I’m finally now writing this review!

Dr Myer’s book is based around her twenty-eight day programme to get you back on track to good health, following a Hypothyroidism or Hyperthyroidism diagnosis. She looks at diet, gut health, stress, supplements and more, all tailored to your situation. 

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I’ll also reference back to this book and what I’ve learnt from it throughout my blog posts.

Amy Myer’s writes with a familiar tone and from a common perspective in her second book, The Thyroid Connection, as a thyroid patient who feels let down by conventional medicine. She’s now a trained functional doctor and works with thyroid patients to help them regain good health and look at what’s going wrong not only inside their body but also in their lifestyle and diet.

She starts with an introduction to thyroid disease – both hypo and hyperthyroidism –  and the epidemic of these conditions being on the rise, but also going undiagnosed and ineffectively treated and managed. Here she includes common signs and symptoms of both and why so many doctors are missing them or leaving patients ineffectively treated for the condition.

Dr Myer’s writes with an obvious passion for helping other people in the same situation she was in – those having their lives affected quite substantially by their thyroid condition – because she knows from her personal experience that this is avoidable and that all thyroid patients deserve to live with better health and quality of life. Throughout the book, she reassures the reader on this.

For me, I found a lot of the chapters regarding what hypo and hyperthyroidism is, signs, symptoms, issues with treatment and inaccurate testing etc. to not be new knowledge to me, or at all surprising, but I read over them anyway to almost refresh some things in my mind. This makes the book accessible to all levels of thyroid patients, though, as if you’ve only just been diagnosed or are just starting to learn more about your thyroid condition and whatnot, then this book would be a very good place to start, with a lot of the basics covered. It’s not overly sciencey either, so you shouldn’t find it too heavy if you’re not particularly great with science (like me!) or live with famous thyroid brain fog.

About a third of the way in to the book and you finally reach Dr Myer’s programme. The information on diet, supplements, gut health, toxins and more, that she bases her programme around. She also has a whole chapter on stress, how it is so delicately interlinked with our thyroid health and how we can better manage it. As part of her plan, I was impressed to find that she included a literal twenty-eight day plan for the reader, with food, supplements and other tasks detailed for each day. She’s clearly spent a lot of time ‘perfecting’ this and if it works for many of her patients, then why not share it in a book for others wishing to try self-help ideas and techniques? It’s quite generous if you ask me.

However, as someone who has already gone gluten free, I found a lot of the dietary suggestions made in the book to be quite scary – no dairy, no processed food whatsoever (not even a little bit), no grains, no legumes, no nightshades, no eggs, only one alcoholic drink on special occasions etc. etc.

Since being gluten free, I have considered going dairy free and, whilst I figure I would eventually adapt to it as I have being GF, it would limit me so much more than gluten already has already. And I love food so much!

Reading a book like this and considering implementing a programme such as The Myer’s Way programme, you will have to be openminded about making big adaptations to your diet amongst other things, so if you’re 100% refusing to budge on that aspect of your life, this book probably isn’t for you and you’ll probably have to accept that your general health may never be as good as it once was, as so many thyroid patients (mainly autoimmune) do much better off foods they’re sensitive to. That’s not saying that we’re all sensitive to the same ones, I feel it’s entirely up to the individual what they feel is most important to them. For me, I can live without bread, pasta, pizza (although you can make GF versions) pretty easily, but dairy I feel would make me so miserable and stressed, it’s probably not worth cutting out at this moment in my life.

But if you can make these changes to at least trial if they help you, then it’s worth a go. And Dr Myer’s does let you incorporate some back in after the initial twenty-eight days.

Dr Myer’s has a straight forward approach and I think many will appreciate this, but others may be put off by her ‘My way or the highway’ (or shall I say ‘Myer’s way or the highway) approach. Personally, I’m very impressed with the book and her programme has clearly been very well thought out and tried and tested, but being honest, I’m not sure all thyroid patients would appreciate it.

The book definitely got me rethinking the importance of my food choices and it was comprehensive in terms of testing and treatment options, but I’m not sure it’s for everyone. If there’s any part of you that’s interested though, by all means I recommend you take a gander.

You can find it on Amazon here: The Thyroid Connection: Why You Feel Tired, Brain-Fogged, and Overweight — And How to Get Your Life Back

And you can see her first book, The Autoimmune Solution, here:
The Autoimmune Solution: Prevent and Reverse the Full Spectrum of Inflammatory Symptoms and Diseases


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-Rachel

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