Christmas Gift Ideas for Hypothyroid Patients

Having a hypothyroid patient on your Christmas shopping list can seem daunting, especially if they follow specific diets or avoid certain chemicals, to help manage their condition/s.

So here I am with a list of ideas for present buying this Christmas season. I hope you find it useful!

(Pssst! If you’re a thyroid patient, you may want to pass this on to your friends and family!)

Continue reading “Christmas Gift Ideas for Hypothyroid Patients”

Getting Housework Done with Hypothyroidism

I’ve always been a tidy, organised person. It’s just who I am. I keep a diary of mine and my fiance’s plans, meetings and reminders and my life is as organised as it can be. This is also reflected in my home and again, always has been. Whilst most twelve year olds were dancing around their room to the latest tune from their favourite band, I was cleaning my room. I was reorganising my already organised room and whizzing round the wooden flooring with baby wipes. I was a strange child. I’ll give you that.

The point is, I’ve always been happy in a clean and tidy environment and I take pride and comfort in such an environment. I feel most relaxed and accomplished in one. My anxiety disorder is calmed when in a clean and tidy room and it never took up much of my time.

But when hypothyroidism struck, this changed my ability to keep it up.  Continue reading “Getting Housework Done with Hypothyroidism”

Mel’s Thyroid Story

This is a guest post, written by a thyroid patient. Mel wants others to be aware of just how life threatening hypothyroidism can be and the implications it can have. 

img_53181


I have tried everything possible as of right now.

I am on 700mcg of Levothyroxine daily, that I have to give to myself as a shot in the thigh, along with 200mcg of Tirosint and 120mcg of Cytomel orally. I also take NDT on top of this. My latest TSH reading was 218.71, despite such high thyroid medication dosage and my Free T4 level was undetectable, with a Free T3 below 1.0. I am not ready to give up but it is such a struggle to keep going daily. The only reason I have found is because of my husband and our seven children.

My thyroid was removed in May 2016 due to being hyperthyroid and having Graves Disease. A fine needle biopsy showed cancer, so it seemed the most sensible option to have my thyroid removed. I will not lie to you, nor try to pretend that I am not scared as hell. My thyroid issues have lead to the stage 3 kidney failure, congestive heart failure, extremely high liver enzymes which has caused irreversible liver damage and severe anxiety.

Plus more, just because we can’t control my thyroid hormone levels.

It has also caused my cholesterol to skyrocket to 487, so I have to do a special dialysis for my cholesterol and I have to do another dialysis for my kidneys. I had to have a port put in because they were doing 400mcg of levothyroxine infusions daily and my veins could no longer handle it. A few weeks ago now, I ended up in emergency surgery due to staph infection in my port, so they had to remove it. Two days later, I was back in the hospital with a secondary infection, so my incision had to be reopened and drained again.

I got my latest last lab results back recently and they sat me down together with my husband and told me there is nothing more they can do for me. They said that my body is slowing down because of my uncontrollable hypothyroidism. They said my life expectancy is anywhere from six to eight months and all they can do is continue my current treatment plan and hope by some miracle that something may change, but at this point their only goal is to keep me as comfortable as possible. On top of my thyroid medication, I also take pain medication, muscle relaxers, beta blockers, two different cholesterol meds, diuretics medication for the fluid retention due to the stage 3 kidney failure and congestive heart failure and what feels like a ton of vitamins and anxiety medications.

I have insurance but it  does not cover all of my medication. My  husband and one of my sons work so hard to pay for my medications and it makes me so sad to know that my nineteen year old son puts his life on the line every day, working in the army, just to help his dad pay for my medication. I could never ask for a better family or a more understanding son. We have to pay the portion the insurance does not cover and that is $5,481.04 every twenty-eight days, just to keep me alive, though body struggling. We have filed every grant possible, every financial aid there is available out there and even went through the pharmaceutical companies for the grants they offer as well.

Please don’t think I am telling you this just to make you or anyone else feel sorry for me. I just want people to know that there is always a story behind why someone might feel negative or down and out, or maybe that person is just feeling overwhelmed and does not want pity or to be told to quit whining. Sometimes it helps just to vent or get it off your chest.

I also want Rachel, who writes The Invisible Hypothyroidism blo, to know that if it were not for her website here, I don’t know where I would be today. I was not going to share this because I was not sure if you would even really care, but a few months ago when I stumbled across your blog, it saved my family so much pain and sorrow. So thank you for saving my life in more ways than one.



Thank you so much Mel for your story. I really do wish you the best in your journey and hope that by selflessly sharing your story, it will open the eyes of others.

When Our Posting On Social Media Annoys Other People

Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat… There’s a new popular social media site every year, it seems. People use them to share life updates with friends and family, to discuss the shows they’re watching, watch funny videos and read articles. Different people use these sites differently. Maybe you only post every now and then or it’s possible you post every day. Do you use it to share happy news and positive posts or possibly to vent about your crap day or seek comfort and help from others? Maybe you do both. Either way, it’s up to you how you use your account.

But who hasn’t shared something that’s irritated someone else? A status that someone has deemed ‘sharing too much’, a political post, ‘yet another moany post’ or even ‘another selfie’. The chances are, at some point, we’ve all shared or posted something online that another social media user has complained about, whether to our faces or not. Perhaps they responded with an ironic, hypocritical post, moaning about the people who moan online.

So where does this tie in with those of us who live with hypothyroidism, Hashimoto’s, adrenal fatigue, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome and all the other related health conditions? Continue reading “When Our Posting On Social Media Annoys Other People”

The Dilemma of Juggling Fun With Repercussions

As a thyroid patient, do you find yourself weighing up whether to have fun – do leisure activities, leave the house or socialise – with feeling ill the next day?

Continue reading “The Dilemma of Juggling Fun With Repercussions”

Receiving a Bear Hugs Gift Box

Bear Hugs is a company I’ve been aware of for a couple of years, when it was still fairly new and on etsy. I’ve sent countless Bear Hugs gift boxes to friends going through a tough spot, poor health or other stressful time and they always went down really well. I felt so glad when they text me, surprised and thankful for the gesture. I obviously saw what they looked like to receive on the Bear Hugs website as well as in the photos my friends took of them when they arrived, but I’d never received one myself or seen them in real life. Until recently.

IMG_7004

Continue reading “Receiving a Bear Hugs Gift Box”

Catching an Illness When You Already Have Hypothyroidism

When the average person gets ill – catches a cold,  a sickness bug, virus etc. – it can feel rubbish enough. Having to take a day or two off work, cancel plans with friends or family and put up with a messy house is all part and parcel of being ill. Everyone gets ill from time to time, even those with the best immune system.

But what is it like for those of us who already live with a chronic illness?  Continue reading “Catching an Illness When You Already Have Hypothyroidism”

Ways You Can Practise Self-care

Do you ever forget to take care of yourself?

Practising self care is crucial for everyone, but more so if you live with chronic and/or mental illness. Finding time to look after you and nourish your body and mind is important and doing so regularly will hopefully help you to manage any physical or mental health conditions. Scheduling even one or two evenings a week where you do some of these activities will help.

So, here are some simple things you can do to practise self care.  Continue reading “Ways You Can Practise Self-care”

You Can Still Live a Full Life With Hypothyroidism

So, you’ve been diagnosed with hypothyroidism and it’s all a bit daunting. You may not be sure what it means or what impact it will have on your life. The truth is, hypothyroidism in almost all cases is a lifelong condition, that requires medication every day for the rest of your life and quite often other lifestyle changes to help manage it.

But it doesn’t have to feel like a death sentence. You can still live a good quality, full life with hypothyroidism.  Continue reading “You Can Still Live a Full Life With Hypothyroidism”

Grieving For Who You Were Before You Had Hypothyroidism

Before twenty, the age at which I started experiencing hypothyroid symptoms that really interfered with my life and became a problem, I was an incredibly busy, active and driven person. Continue reading “Grieving For Who You Were Before You Had Hypothyroidism”