Take Back Control: Order Your Own Thyroid Tests

Do you still feel like rubbish even though your doctor is insistent that your test results are coming  back ‘fine’ or ‘normal’? Perhaps your doctor isn’t running all the thyroid tests that you want? Many thyroid patients benefit from being more involved in their thyroid care and treatment, which is where self-testing and the ability to order your own tests can be critical tools for empowering yourself. Continue reading “Take Back Control: Order Your Own Thyroid Tests”

What You Need To Know About Doing Thyroid Blood Tests

Common questions about thyroid blood tests include: Do I take my thyroid medication as normal before the blood draw? How often should it be done? Do I need to fast? Does it need to be in the morning? Can it be done in the afternoon?  Continue reading “What You Need To Know About Doing Thyroid Blood Tests”

Hair Loss and Hypothyroidism

Losing your hair can be very upsetting. It’s not just vanity, but it also contributes to your identity. I’m going to cover the many possible causes and treatments for hair loss.  Continue reading “Hair Loss and Hypothyroidism”

Inadequate Free T3 Is a Big Problem

Could low Free T3 be causing you ongoing issues?

There are binding proteins that attach to thyroid hormones to travel through the blood vessels, to cells all over our body. When they reach the cells, only the unbound “free” hormones can actually be used by the cells. Therefore Free T3 levels (and Free T4!) are important to monitor. It’s important to be aware that F ree T3 and Free T4 are different to Total T3 and Total T4, with Total being pretty much useless. Make sure you check Free.

Continue reading “Inadequate Free T3 Is a Big Problem”

What Does Borderline/Subclinical Hypothyroid Mean?

I hate the term ‘borderline hypothyroid’ or ‘subclinical hypothyroidism’. It leaves many people undiagnosed and ill. Many just get worse and worse with time.  Continue reading “What Does Borderline/Subclinical Hypothyroid Mean?”

Series: My AF. Entry 7: Well.. That Didn’t Go as I Thought: An Update on My Adrenal Fatigue and Underactive Thyroid

After finding out I had adrenal fatigue in the form of high cortisol all day, back in January, I worked on lowering this. I took Seriphos, among many other vitamins and supplements, I implemented a stricter bedtime schedule and diet and have been dealing with stress a lot better/constructively.

I’ve come on in leaps and bounds with how I feel, and I saw it in my thyroid blood tests too, when my pooling Free T3, came down to normal levels. I’ve been symptom free and living without any interference from my thyroid and adrenals for a while.

So when I got my latest adrenal stress test results today, I was devastated to see that my cortisol had not come down. It’s actually kind of got worse.

In January, I had elevated cortisol at all four tested points of the day. For my June readings, I show elevated cortisol three times of the day, with the other one now optimal (good). But the elevated ones have got worse. They’re ‘more elevated’. I just don’t understand it! I feel so much better and I’m sleeping better. Confused is an understatement.

I think I could have blood sugar imbalances, after reading about it in Dr Datis Kharrazian’s book, and I think I might get hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) when I eat refined carbs and sugar. My diet for the most part these days is good, but I want to rule out low blood sugar, still. When you have low blood sugar, the adrenal glands produce extra cortisol, so I need to check if this is what’s causing it, and if not, well, then I can tick it off. So, I’ve ordered an at-home blood sugar testing kit. 12418071_10209343858540590_183329346683076889_n

I also had some more bloods taken last week and it found my MCH (Mean corpuscular hemoglobin) is below the ‘normal range’, and my ferritin is also low in range at 47. Sources like STTM recommend it being 70-90 for optimal iron levels. So my doctor has given me some iron tablets to see if they help.

After returning to two NDT tablets a day for my thyroid, my full thyroid panel reads well and I’ve been feeling good, so my thyroid seems under control for now.

Just these darn adrenals!

I knew it was too soon to say I was feeling completely better! Well, I guess I am feeling completely better, it’s just that the high cortisol is still concerning as long term, if it stays elevated, it could progress in to combined and then low cortisol which isn’t good. So I need to catch this in the bud. I’m also going to start Ashwagandha which is an adaptogen. These help even out your cortisol levels, so lower high and raise low. STTM have more info here. I have some Holy Basil and Seriphos left but I’m going to try Ashwagandha alone for now.

The bottle says to take 2-4 a day for at least three months, so I’m going to take 3 a day, 1 at each high cortisol reading I have. Then retest my cortisol levels.

These are the ones I got from Amazon – ORGANIC INDIA Ashwagandha Herbal Supplement Veg Capsules, Healthy Stress Response- 60 Capsules

I’ve been reading that low blood sugar can cause high cortisol and vice versa, plus high cortisol and low blood sugar can cause high blood pressure. And back in May my BP was still a bit too high. My GP says low blood sugar causing high cortisol is possible, so encouraged me to monitor my blood sugar levels at home and make adjustments where necessary.

Sigh. Round two, commence.

You can click on the hyperlinks in the above post to learn more and see references to information given.

Pregnancy and Hypothyroidism

Pregnancy and Hypothyroidism.

How can Hypothyroidism develop during/after pregnancy?

As pregnancy is stressful on the body, it can induce hypothyroidism. For some women, this starts during pregnancy, but it’s after pregnancy that a lot are diagnosed. Some recover after a month or two, but many are left with hypothyroidism for the rest of their lives, requiring medication.

Hashimoto’s Healing explains that during pregnancy, the body goes through many hormonal changes and the immune system makes adjustments in order to preserve the fetus and not reject it as a foreign invader.

The Th-1 suppression ends after birth and this causes the immune system to surge. If it is already unstable, then this can trigger the start of Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis. Hashimoto’s is usually triggered.  Continue reading “Pregnancy and Hypothyroidism”

Thyroid Hormone Conversion and The Problem That Can Happen

A conversion problem can cause weight gain and on going symptoms, with hypothyroidism, due to inefficient levels of thyroid hormones. A conversion problem of thyroid hormones is often not considered by doctors to be a possibility for patients who don’t respond well to T4-only medication, but it is much more common than they realise. 

If you are on T4-only medication such as Levothyroxine, Synthroid etc. and still don’t feel fully well, then it is likely you could not be converting T4 to T3

Continue reading “Thyroid Hormone Conversion and The Problem That Can Happen”

What Are Optimal Thyroid Levels?

It’s a term I, and so many other sources for thyroid information, use a lot. What Are Optimal Thyroid Levels?  

A lot of conventional medicine doctors and endocrinologists refuse to acknowledge that it’s not just about falling ‘in range’, but it’s where in range you fall that matters. It matters entirely. Functional doctors support these levels.

Put simply, when your doctor runs a test and you get the results, optimal levels are the results that most thyroid patients state they feel best at. This is a place within a given ‘range’.  Continue reading “What Are Optimal Thyroid Levels?”