Are You Taking Your Thyroid Medication Properly?

How difficult can it be, right? You just swallow your thyroid medication with water and that’s that.

Wrong.

Advice on how to take your medication, whether given by doctors, pharmacists or even on medication box leaflets, can be confusing and contradicting. Let’s explore various factors that can influence our thyroid medication and how best to take it, so that you’re getting the most out of it as possible.

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What You Need To Know About Doing Thyroid Blood Tests

Common questions about thyroid blood tests include: Do I take my thyroid medication as normal before the blood draw? How often should it be done? Do I need to fast? Does it need to be in the morning? Can it be done in the afternoon?  Continue reading “What You Need To Know About Doing Thyroid Blood Tests”

If NDT Is Good Enough for a Former First Lady, Surely It’s Good Enough for Me?

Yes, Hilary Clinton has an underactive thyroid. Yes, she takes Armour, a brand of NDT for it.  Continue reading “If NDT Is Good Enough for a Former First Lady, Surely It’s Good Enough for Me?”

Thyroid Hormone Conversion and The Problem That Can Happen

A conversion problem can cause weight gain and on going symptoms, with hypothyroidism, due to inefficient levels of thyroid hormones. A conversion problem of thyroid hormones is often not considered by doctors to be a possibility for patients who don’t respond well to T4-only medication, but it is much more common than they realise. 

If you are on T4-only medication such as Levothyroxine, Synthroid etc. and still don’t feel fully well, then it is likely you could not be converting T4 to T3

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Levothyroxine and TSH; ‘The Gold Standard’

Both taken with no make up on, no filters or edits, first thing in the morning and just out the shower.

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What’s the difference then? Continue reading “Levothyroxine and TSH; ‘The Gold Standard’”

Acid Reflux, Low Stomach Acid and Hypothyroidism

Stomach acid is needed in the body to break down food and get rid of bad bacteria. It is made as and when you eat, but many hypothyroid patients have low stomach acid, which leads to GORD, GERD, acid reflux, heartburn, indigestion, acid regurgitation, difficulty swallowing, chest pain/discomfort, cough and even hoarseness.

Research has found that the older your body gets, the lower your levels of stomach acid can become, but many hypothyroid patients are surprised to learn that their acid reflux can be related to a poorly treated underactive thyroid. Continue reading “Acid Reflux, Low Stomach Acid and Hypothyroidism”

Being Hypothyroid with a Normal TSH

Have you been told that your TSH is ‘normal’, ‘fine’, ‘OK’,  or ‘in range’, and still have hypothyroid symptoms? You could be on thyroid medication or not, and have a TSH as described above, and still be hypothyroid.

You could be hypothyroid at a cellular level, due to conversion problems of T4 into T3.

Continue reading “Being Hypothyroid with a Normal TSH”

Why Do I Get Free Prescriptions When on Levothyroxine?

For those of us living in the UK and using the NHS, prescriptions are free to those in Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales, but not in England. However, there are certain people in England who can access free NHS prescriptions for medication, if they fit certain criteria such as having hypothyroidism and being on Levothyroxine.

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Series: New Meds. Entry 6: Series: My AF. Entry 2: Five Months Into NDT: An Update on My Adrenal Fatigue and Underactive Thyroid

So, if you’ve been following my blog, you’ll know that I’m actually doing rather well! My thyroid levels are finally reading well, meaning that my on-going fatigue (which has been gradually getting better) is likely due to my adrenal fatigue, in the form of high cortisol. Rather than to do with my thyroid. 

Continue reading “Series: New Meds. Entry 6: Series: My AF. Entry 2: Five Months Into NDT: An Update on My Adrenal Fatigue and Underactive Thyroid”