Adrenaline and the Link to Your Thyroid

I’ve got a big day ahead of me today,with two major things happening. Apart from feeling nervous about them, I have SO much energy. Why? I’m thinking: adrenaline. 

The adrenal glands are part of the endocrine system, as is the thyroid gland, so they work together.

My adrenals seem to be kicking in by providing me with an adrenaline boost, the hormone that initiates the fight (from fight or flight) response. It gives us what we need to face potentially scary situations. These situations can be anything from waiting for a ride at a theme park, having an important meeting, a job interview, doctor appointment or being in a serious accident. You hear about people being able to lift heavy weights after/during a serious accident, such as lifting a car to get people out from underneath it, and adrenaline is always reported as the reason why.

Adrenaline can make your heart pound faster, increase blood pressure, give you more energy and increase blood flow to muscles, while mobilizing sugar to burn. It can also temporarily affect your metabolic rate. Our bodies respond to the ‘threatening situation’ by generating a huge amount of energy in a short amount of time, which enables us to either run away, or face the ‘threat’ and fight it with a massive influx of chemical support.

I noticed I had increased energy, from my usual lack of it, when I could run up the stairs and run to catch the tram this morning without feeling worn out by it. That sort of thing would have me breathless, normally!

You can click on the hyperlinks in the above post to learn more and see references to information given, but more reading and references can also be found at:

http://www.hormone.org/hormones-and-health/what-do-hormones-do/adrenaline

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I run a Facebook group, called Thyroid Family: Hypothyroidism Advice & Support Group. This group is for underactive thyroid/hypothyroidism patients only, and not medical professionals or anyone else. If you have any questions on living with hypothyroidism, or want some support, help or advice, please join us. 

I also run a group for the spouses, partners and other halves of hypothyroid patients, called Hypothyroid Patients Other Halves – Support & Advice Group. This is for the other halves only and not patients. 

-Rachel

About Rachel Hill, The Invisible Hypothyroidism

Diagnosed with Hypothyroidism, Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME), as well as having Adrenal Fatigue and experience with Depression and Anxiety Disorder, Rachel Hill blogs at theinvisiblehypothyroidism.com to help others, covering all aspects of what it’s like to have these conditions. Rachel is one of the many faces of thyroid disease and she’s passionate about helping those with hypothyroidism and giving them a voice.
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