Why I Love Bubble Baths

Ahh, just thinking about a bubble bath right now is making me feel relaxed. They’re warm, they smell nice, they’re relaxing and leave us feeling clean, soft and smelling pleasant. What’s not to like?!

Well, add to that the benefits that bubble baths can give us for our hypothyroidism, and they’re just too good to resist..

Sweating out toxins

Hot bubble baths help us to sweat, and sweating is good for getting rid of toxins from inside the body. Daily sweating is essential, along with drinking enough water and going toilet, to get rid of out bad stuff and waste.

You could also add some Epsom Salts to help with this.

Tiredness and sleeping

When I feel tired, I have a bubble bath to encourage it and help me wind down for bed. The smells, the warm feeling and soft skin when getting in to bed just reinforces that ready-to-sleep feeling. If I have a shower before bed, it’s not always the same experience. I tend to feel less sleepy and more energised. With baths, you can just lay back and relax. Getting enough sleep is essential for hypothyroid patients.

If you’re struggling to get to sleep at night, possibly due to high cortisol (adrenal fatigue) messing up your sleeping patterns, then a bubble bath should help you get ready for sleep. Close your eyes, concentrate on the warmth and smell of the bath foam, and relax. Light some candles and turn off the main bathroom light, if that helps create a better atmosphere. It could also help encourage your melatonin to rise, getting you ready for bed. Normally, melatonin levels begin to rise in the mid to late evening, but light affects how much melatonin your body produces. So avoid TV, electronics and harsh lights as you get later in to the evening. A dimly lit bathroom with a bubble bath should therefore help. Epsom Salts can also help to relax muscles and get you sleepy.

Aches and pains

Bubble baths have worked wonders for my achey and painful hypothyroid muscles and joints. Especially at the end of a long day, where I’ve been on my feet a lot, bubble baths feel like heaven. The warm water soothes and relaxes muscles, but also promotes increased blood flow and circulation to the area, eliminating any lactic acid buildup.

I feel like the feeling of weightlessness also adds to the relief of muscle soreness and aches and pains in my joints.

Adding Epsom salts can again, help with this.

Softening hair and skin

Using the right products, and not over-bathing, of course keeps hair and skin hydrated, moisturised and feeling and looking good. Battling with hypothyroidism can mean hair becomes sparse and dry, and skin becomes dry and flakey. Organic products are often the best as they have less nasty chemicals that can contribute to poor hair and skin. You should try to wash hair twice a week max (this is what my hairdresser says), to avoid over-washing and removing protective oils.

You can click on the hyperlinks in the above post to learn more and see references to information given, but more reading and references can also be found at:

http://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/heavy-metals-hormones-and-hashimotos

http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/tc/melatonin-overview

http://johnstonhealth.org/2012/03/5-tips-to-improve-blood-circulation/

Because I want my blog to remain as transparent as possible, it’s important that you know I have used affiliate links in this post. This means I earn a tiny amount for each product purchased through Amazon from my blog. This doesn’t change that I love these products, it just means that as well as sharing what I love, if I drive any traffic to Amazon through the hard work of my blog, the running costs of my site get supported. Thank you. 

To get notified of all my posts, blogs and articles, like my Facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/TheInvisibleHypothyroidism/ 

And follow me on Instagram.

I run a Facebook group, called Thyroid Family: Hypothyroidism Advice & Support Group. This group is for underactive thyroid/hypothyroidism patients only, and not medical professionals or anyone else. If you have any questions on living with hypothyroidism, or want some support, help or advice, please join us. 

I also run a group for the spouses, partners and other halves of hypothyroid patients, called Hypothyroid Patients Other Halves – Support & Advice Group. This is for the other halves only and not patients. 

-Rachel

About Rachel Hill, The Invisible Hypothyroidism

Diagnosed with Hypothyroidism, Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME), as well as having Adrenal Fatigue and experience with Depression and Anxiety Disorder, Rachel Hill blogs at theinvisiblehypothyroidism.com to help others, covering all aspects of what it’s like to have these conditions. Rachel is one of the many faces of thyroid disease and she’s passionate about helping those with hypothyroidism and giving them a voice.
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