What to Do After Being ‘Glutened’

For many autoimmune hypothyroid patients (around 90% of us with an underactive thyroid), following a gluten free diet and lifestyle is key to helping them feel better and manage their condition more effectively. 

But what happens if you’re ‘glutened’ by mistake?

First of all, try not to beat yourself up about it. Whether someone else has glutened you, despite you quizzing them on ingredients, or whether you’ve accidentally glutened yourself, being hard on yourself afterwards isn’t going to help. What you need to do now is focus on getting your body over it as soon as possible.

For many of us, eating gluten causes pesky symptoms such as nasty toilet experiences, acne, heart palpitations, wind, bloating, brain fog and mood swings to name just a few. So trying to overcome those as soon as possible is really important in getting your health back on track.

Drinking plenty of water will help to flush the gluten through your system and keep you hydrated if you’re having bad toilet trips from being glutened. If ingesting gluten causes you constipation, bloating or wind, you can also try hot drinks such as half a lemon freshly squeezed in to some water or herbal tea, as they can help to move things along. Lemons also contain antioxidant compounds that activate detoxifying enzymes.

Chia seeds are also great for getting your bowels moving, so you can add these simple seeds to your food for the next few days to help your body expel the gluten. They’re also pretty high in anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids, which help to reduce the inflammation caused by ingesting gluten. Inexpensive and simple enough to scatter or mix into everything, it’s definitely worth adding.

Turmeric and ginger are great natural and inexpensive anti-inflammatories. Ginger can even help to ease stomach cramping. You can take them in tea, hot water or even smoothies.

Drinking Bone broth is helpful as it’s high in anti-inflammatories and helps to protect and heal the mucosal lining of the digestive tract that can get disrupted by being glutened. You should consider adding this to your daily routine anyway to promote overall good health.

Pro-biotics are helpful when taken daily anyway, as they help our guts and support the immune system. You may want to increase your probiotic intake for a few days after gluten ingestion.

Digestive enzymes help to speed up the breakdown and absorption of macronutrients, so you can take an enzyme to help move things along. Dr Amy Myers recommends looking for one that includes dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP-IV), which helps to break down gluten specifically.

And rest. If being glutened has caused heavy fatigue, inflammation leading to painful joints, achey muscles or even brain fog, remember to listen to your body and rest if you need it. We often push ourselves more than is ideal and can cause a setback in our health. So listen to your body.

Gluten sensitivity as well as Coeliac’s disease can really wreak havoc on our bodies. I hope you’re feeling better soon!

You can click on the hyperlinks in the above post to learn more and see references to information given, but further information can also be found at:





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One thought on “What to Do After Being ‘Glutened’

  1. Great post! I also have Hashimoto’s disease and gluten problems so I can definitely relate to a few times where I had accidentally consumed gluten- it was terrible.

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