Take Back Control: Order Your Own Thyroid Tests

Do you still feel like rubbish even though your doctor is insistent that your test results are coming  back ‘fine’ or ‘normal’? Perhaps your doctor isn’t running all the thyroid tests that you want? Many thyroid patients benefit from being more involved in their thyroid care and treatment, which is where self-testing and the ability to order your own tests can be critical tools for empowering yourself. Continue reading “Take Back Control: Order Your Own Thyroid Tests”

What You Need To Know About Doing Thyroid Blood Tests

Common questions about thyroid blood tests include: Do I take my thyroid medication as normal before the blood draw? How often should it be done? Do I need to fast? Does it need to be in the morning? Can it be done in the afternoon?  Continue reading “What You Need To Know About Doing Thyroid Blood Tests”

Questions To Ask at Your First Endocrinologist Appointment

Your first endocrinologist (often referred to as an endo) visit can seem daunting, so the below information covers what to expect from your first visit and the sorts of questions you may want to ask.  Continue reading “Questions To Ask at Your First Endocrinologist Appointment”

An Open Letter: “Dear Doctor, It’s Not All in My Head”

This ‘open letter’ has been inspired by the large amount of thyroid patients who are told by doctors that their symptoms are ‘all in their head’, dismissed and made to feel like hypochondriacs. I experienced this myself, and on such a day, I came home, ordered the new thyroid medicine I wanted to try and set up this blog.  Continue reading “An Open Letter: “Dear Doctor, It’s Not All in My Head””

Difficulties Having Blood Taken

For as long as I can remember, it’s never been easy to take my blood. It can take as many as ten attempts, and I’m left sore and bruised afterwards.

My veins seem to hide away, and even when I spent three weeks in hospital a few years ago when very ill, and had to have blood taken and drips and tubes in me 24/7, it didn’t get any easier. I remember screaming out in pain when they started taking it from the back of my hand.

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Continue reading “Difficulties Having Blood Taken”

You Should Always Get a Print-Out of Your Test Results

Whenever you have any tests done by the doctor, endocrinologist or another medical practitioner, always always always get the results printed out. You should be keeping a record of your medical history and notes at home so you can refer back to them whenever you need, and so you can see the full picture of your thyroid health.

Not just thyroid tests, but vitamin level tests and any others are good to keep a record of when exploring/maintaining your overall thyroid health. 12472340_10209343860940650_1736572743489020858_n

A problem can arise when patients feel too intimidated to ask, because of unhelpful receptionists or doctors who imply that you can’t have them.

However, the NHS Constitution contains a right for patients to access their health records, which is covered by the Data Protection Act 1998.

This says:

“You have the right of access to your own health records. These will always be used to manage your treatment in your best interests.”

Continue reading “You Should Always Get a Print-Out of Your Test Results”

25th May is World Thyroid Day 2016

The 25th May this year is World Thyroid Day, so you can expect any thyroid awareness organisations, advocates and charities to be posting about it; including me. 

200 million people in the world have some form of thyroid disease, including 1 in 20 people in the UK. As many as 60% are undiagnosed, and of those diagnosed, a lot are not adequately treated. This is why we need to keep on sharing information about the condition and encourage anyone with symptoms of hypothyroidism or hyperthyrodism to get checked out.  Continue reading “25th May is World Thyroid Day 2016”

It’s Been One and a Half Weeks Since I Lowered My NDT Dosage

Following on from my blog post 11 days ago about lowering my NDT from 2 tablets a day to 1.75, I thought an update would be a good idea.

Continue reading “It’s Been One and a Half Weeks Since I Lowered My NDT Dosage”

Reducing My NDT Dosage

Going by my endocrinologist’s advice in his last letter, I am reducing my daily NDT dosage. I am currently on 2 grains a day, taking 1 in the morning and 1 mid-afternoon. I will cut it down to 1.75 grains a day, with 1 still taken in the morning and the rest mid-afternoon.

I’m not convinced it’s going to help my on-going symptom that is left – fatigue, but we’ll see. Unlike many of the doctors I see and know of from other thyroid patients, I AM willing to consider other ideas and give things a try.. So we’ll see. My latest thyroid blood results read well (well, to me. The endo didn’t like how low my TSH was, but admitted my Free T3 and Free T4 were good), so I’m not sure it’s gonna help. If not actually bring back some of my hypo symptoms.

Continue reading “Reducing My NDT Dosage”

What is Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, more often referred to as just Hashimoto’s, is an autoimmune disease and considered to be the most common cause of Hypothyroidism (around 90%), yet thyroid antibodies are often not tested by doctors, who refuse to acknowledge it’s importance.

You may be reading this right now and have no idea that you even have this autoimmune disease, Hashimoto’s. It is estimated that Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis causes 90% of all cases of hypothyroidism.

Hypothyroidism is more often than not caused by an autoimmune disease, and it’s suspected that the large majority, 90%, of those with hypothyroidism have Hashimoto’s as their autoimmune disease culprit.

Continue reading “What is Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?”